Humanities Information

Shakespeare and Human Nature


Isn't it peculiar how human nature evolves through environmental and socialogical conditions? It is evident that we, as Human beings, tend to characterize our capabilities, strengths and emotional intelligence through bonds of society. As we encounter diverse walks of life we have a bizarre and acute tendency to create new personalities. Through human nature, we unintentionally become one with our counterparts. One can travel East to West, North to South and eventually evolution of the mind and soul takes its natural course.

Although differences exist, we enable ourselves to find common bonds of life in general. In doing so, we can interrelate with each other and attain goals that apart, are seemingly impossible. In doing so, great undertakings are initiated. We revolutionize our world through interaction and coexistence.

Even the most minute action creates an affect. In human nature, we attract those that mirror ourselves in small ways. By relating to past and present circumstances, we shape our world of tomorrow. Like clay, we mold ourselves to the structures that be. Perhaps chameleons display the best sense of human nature as they cleverly and instantaneously blend with their surroundings. Not only is this an excellent manuever to avoid danger, it is also a profound way to "fit in" and become one with its immediate environment.

Human nature never ceases amazement. We nurture ourselves with spirituality, duality and even complacency at times, but throughout life , we always manage to grow from our experiences. We learn acceptance and emotional understanding through our compelling desire to "be." Shakespeare's haunting & elusive words, "...to be or not to be...that is the question..." is the most profound phrase in human history. All human nature revolves around this particular piece of artistry - "...to be or not to be..." Shakespeare querried all Mankind.

Human nature is intriquitely defined by its owner. If we wish to merely exist, then exist we do. But if we take his question to a higher state of mind, we find life's perfect answer: Mankind's nature is to evolve. Not only to simply exist but to assure nonextinction of our species. We must use our natural instincts and capabilities to overcome and conquer. That, as in all things, must mature and ripen to a state of wholeness. Human nature may fool those and lure unsuspecting travelers of time, but the higher truth of human nature is the self exploration of life and the ability to broaden horizons of the self or "alter ego" and other individuals so they, too may come to see and equally realize the unequivocal and honest meaning of life.

Yes, Shakespeare conquered literature with his defined works of human nature; but the question he asks of us still confuses even the most intelligent and collegiate individuals of our time. In this day and age, we have a choice "to be or not to be." This is no longer an inquiry but an option. We, as Humans, must choose the path of higher truth and awareness. By remaining unattached, we choose not to fully exist. A play of words can tantalize the senses, but Human nature can enrich the world in which we live. The choice is yours.

01/2003

C. Bailey-Lloyd
aka. LadyCamelot
Public Relations' Director & Staff Writer for Holistic Junction - Your Source for information on Massage Therapy Schools, Holistic Practitioners, Alternative Health, Insightful literature and more!


MORE RESOURCES:




DO | Humanities on a Deserted Island  Cornell University The Cornell Daily Sun




Humanities Division welcomes two new associate deans  University of California, Santa Cruz































The Harvard Crimson  Harvard Crimson





Norman J. Radow College of Humanities and Social Sciences  Norman J. Radow College of Humanities and Social Sciences


Spreading the word  University of California, Irvine






























Innovation at Bryn Mawr  Bryn Mawr Now







Oh, the Humanities!  Washington Free Beacon











DO | On Studying the Humanities  Cornell University The Cornell Daily Sun






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