Humanities Information

What is Your Birthstone?


Just about everyone knows what his or her birthstone is.Why is that? Because people still enjoy the folklore associated with the tradition of the birthstone. They like believing that wearing a birthstone brings them good luck and protects them.

Early civilization as far back as the Assyrians (1400 BC) invested rare and beautiful gemstones with magical properties. Some minerals were thought to contain a force or possess certain values and powers. For instance, amethyst was said to prevent intoxication.

Tradition associates a gem with each sign of the zodiac based on a color system. Color was thought to unleash the power attributed to the stone.

In time, birthstones became associated with calendar months rather than the zodiac. And people began to select birthstones in colors other than the original.

The Roman, Arabic, Jewish, Polish, Russian and Italian lists were all different.

The following list of birthstones, which is the one commonly used today, was adopted in 1912 by the American National Association of Jewelers, which later evolved into the Jewelers of America.

January -- Garnet
February -- Amethyst
March -- Aquamarine
April -- Diamond
May -- Emerald
June -- Moonstone
July -- Ruby
August -- Peridot
September -- Sapphire
October -- Opal or Tourmaline
November -- Yellow Topaz or Citrine
December -- Sky Blue Turquoise or Blue Topaz

Julie Lee is a web designer and founder of Julie's Jewelry Design, LLC. Julie's Jewels is a Texas based retail jewelry company specializing in high quality, affordable jewelry pieces created to be treasured for a lifetime.


MORE RESOURCES:


The Review: The Humanities' Professional Deformations  The Chronicle of Higher Education







DO | Humanities on a Deserted Island  Cornell University The Cornell Daily Sun






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Spreading the word  University of California, Irvine


PHOTO | Deck the Wall  Texarkana Gazette


Walt Whitman research added to Bowen Archive  The Edwardsville Intelligencer


Class keeps history alive and accessible  Texas Woman's University



New Babson Philosophy Professor  Babson Thought & Action



Mercyhurst Education Programs  Mercyhurst University



In memoriam: Harbindar Sanghara  University of Victoria





















DO | On Studying the Humanities  Cornell University The Cornell Daily Sun





Oh, the Humanities!  Washington Free Beacon







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